Aaron Bisman

JDub Records | jdubrecordsarchive.tumblr.com

2003-2005

Bio

Aaron Bisman builds and manages cultural brands and institutions, with a particular focus on developing new audiences for emerging artists, content, and experiences. He is Director of Audience Development at Jazz at Lincoln Center where he is focused on sharing the joy, history and importance of jazz with an international audience. Aaron manages the creation, dissemination, and monetization of audio, video, and digital content through owned and paid media and through new business initiatives. Aaron was a recipient of the Joshua Venture Fellowship in 2003 for his work at JDub, which he ran from 2002 through 2012, during which time he also co-created and co-managed the Six Points Fellowship for Emerging Jewish Artists. Aaron lives in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn with his wife, Amanda Pogany, Head of School at Luria Academy of Brooklyn, and their three children. Follow him @bizmonides.

JDub Records

JDub Records was founded in December of 2002 by two NYU students, Ben Hesse and Aaron Bisman, as a non-profit dedicated to innovative Jewish content, community, and cross-cultural dialogue. Its mission is twofold: to create community among young Jews, their friends, and significant others by promoting proud, authentic Jewish voices in popular culture; and to offer young adults opportunities to connect with their Judaism in the secular world in which they live.

JDub has grown into an internationally recognized brand, having spurred a national conversation about Judaism in mainstream culture – most prominently by Hasidic reggae singer Matisyahu, whom JDub discovered, promoted, and managed through March 2006. Currently, JDub has offices in New York and Los Angeles, 12 artists on the label, and a full calendar of concerts and events planned across the country. In October 2009, JDub aquired Jewcy.com, the premiere online media outlet devoted to presenting a spectrum of conversations on Jewish identity and community for and by young Jews.

JDub empowers young Jews to expand the definition of “Jewish community” and make space for a proactive, celebratory and diverse sense of Jewish identity. Today, in an age where celebrity is king, the opportunity for Jewish role models to emerge in public spheres is a chance to relate our values and history to the next generation, in their language and on their terms.